captivate vs capture

captivate vs capture
  Captivate is a verb used to describe the action of attracting and holding the attention or interest of something or someone.
  For example: After being unrolled and revealed to Caesar, Cleopatra captivated him with her intelligence.
  Capture is a verb used to describe the action of taking by force or stratagem, to take control of or to record in a lasting form.
  For example: The photograph captured the joy of the bride and groom.

English dictionary of common mistakes and confusing words. 2014.

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  • captivate vs capture —   Captivate is a verb used to describe the action of attracting and holding the attention or interest of something or someone.   For example: After being unrolled and revealed to Caesar, Cleopatra captivated him with her intelligence.   Capture… …   English dictionary of common mistakes and confusing words

  • Captivate — Cap ti*vate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Captivated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Captivating}.] [L. captivatus, p. p. of captivare to capture, fr. captivus captive. See {Captive}.] 1. To take prisoner; to capture; to subdue. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Their woes whom… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • captivate — (v.) 1520s, to enthrall with charm, from L.L. captivatus, pp. of captivare to take, capture, from captivus (see CAPTIVE (Cf. captive)). Literal sense (1550s) is rare or obsolete. Latin captare also had a transf. sense of to entice, entrap, allure …   Etymology dictionary

  • captivate — [kap′tə vāt΄] vt. captivated, captivating [< LL(Ec) captivatus, pp. of captivare, to take captive < L captivus: see CAPTIVE] 1. Obs. to take or hold captive 2. to capture the attention or affection of, as by beauty, excellence, etc.;… …   English World dictionary

  • capture — [16] Along with its relatives captive, captivity, captivate, and captor, capture is the English language’s most direct lineal descendant of Latin capere ‘take, seize’ (others include capable, case for carrying things, cater, and chase, and heave… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • capture — [16] Along with its relatives captive, captivity, captivate, and captor, capture is the English language’s most direct lineal descendant of Latin capere ‘take, seize’ (others include capable, case for carrying things, cater, and chase, and heave… …   Word origins

  • capture — I. noun Etymology: Middle French, from Latin captura, from captus Date: circa 1542 1. an act or instance of capturing: as a. an act of catching, winning, or gaining control by force, stratagem, or guile b. a move in a board game (as chess or… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • captivate — transitive verb ( vated; vating) Date: circa 1555 1. archaic seize, capture 2. to influence and dominate by some special charm, art, or trait and with an irresistible appeal Synonyms: see attract • captivation …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • captivate — captivatingly, adv. captivation, n. captivative, adj. captivator, n. /kap teuh vayt /, v.t., captivated, captivating. 1. to attract and hold the attention or interest of, as by beauty or excellence; enchant: Her blue eyes and red hair captivated… …   Universalium

  • capture — 1. noun a) An act of capturing. b) Something that has been captured; a captive. 2. verb a) To take control of. My pawn was captured. b) …   Wiktionary

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